Voting information on Measures

Vote on Nov. 6 in the general election Vote on Nov. 6 in the general election

Your vote is your voice as an American citizen. It’s your opportunity to be heard, to hold elected officials accountable for their decisions and to have a say in important issues that affect your community. On election day, every vote matters. This year, the general election will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 6. All North Dakota voting information may be accessed through the official web site. This year, there are five special measures on the ballot.

ABOUT THE STATEWIDE INITIATED MEASURES

MEASURE 1:

Constitutional Measure No. 1 was placed on the ballot by action of the 2011 North Dakota Legislative Assembly with the passage of Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 4006 (2011 Session Laws, Ch. 520). If approved, this constitutional measure would repeal section 6 of Article X of the North Dakota Constitution. It would eliminate the authority of the legislative assembly to levy an annual poll tax.

The measure as it will appear on the ballot reads: This constitutional Measure would repeal section 6 of Article X of the North Dakota Constitution. This measure would eliminate the authority of the legislative assembly to levy and annual poll tax.

YES – means you approve the measure as summarized above.

NO – means you reject the measure as summarized above.

North Dakota Farmers Union has no position on this measure

This measure cleans up an antiquated part of our states constitution. Poll taxes have long been deemed unconstitutional, so even if the legislature wanted to institute a poll tax they would be unable to do so. This measure removes old language that granted the legislature the authority to institute a poll tax.

MEASURE 2:

Constitutional Measure No. 2 was placed on the ballot by action of the 2011 North Dakota Legislative Assembly with the passage of House Concurrent Resolution No. 3009 (2011 Session Laws, Ch. 521). If approved, this constitutional measure would amend and reenact section 4 of Article XI of the North Dakota Constitution. It would require members of the executive branch of state government to take the oath of office as prescribed in this section of the constitution.

The measure as it will appear on the ballot reads: This constitutional measure would amend and reenact section 4 of Article XI of the North Dakota Constitution. This measure would require members of the executive branch of state government to take the oath of office as prescribed in this section.

YES – means you approve the measure as stated above.

NO – means you reject the measure as stated above.

North Dakota Farmers Union has no position on this measure.

This would expand the requirement of an oath of office to the executive branch. This measure came about due to a claim by some individuals that North Dakota is not actually a state because its executive branch is not required by the constitution to take an oath of office. This measure fixes that oversight and adds the executive branch to the other branches of government in the requirement of taking an oath of office.

MEASURE 3: Right to Farm

WHAT THE AMENDMENT DOES

Adds a new section to the state constitution that guarantees the right of farmers and ranchers to engage in modern farming and ranching practices. It prohibits any law that “abridges the right of farmers and ranchers to employ agricultural technology, modern livestock production and ranching practices.”

NDFU’s POSITION: OPPOSE

  • The amendment is contrary to many NDFU policy positions, including those regarding stewardship, responsibility, a balance between conservation and agriculture interests, and others. 
  • Unlike the state’s current right-to-farm statute, the amendment doesn’t require that a farmer/rancher use sound agricultural practices or operate without negligence, as the measure guarantees an unlimited right to use any “modern” practice.
  • It would prohibit any law —local zoning, state statute, agency regulation from animal cruelty prevention to water/health regulations to GMO regulation or segregation rules — that would regulate agricultural practices. As a result, we will lose local control and the authority to find solutions at the local and state level.
  • Further, while this constitutional “right” would trump local and state laws, federal law will preempt it and will remain in place. Any authority the state or local government might currently have to provide reasonable regulation will be gone, and the federal law would be all that’s left, even if it isn’t a good fit. 
MEASURE 4: Smoking Ban

 WHAT THE MEASURE DOES

Expands smoking ban to bars, gambling and gaming facilities, adult day care facilities, nursing home rooms, public transportation, enclosed areas in public places, places of employment, and outdoors when within 20 ft. of entrances, exits, windows, air intakes and ventilation systems. It bans smoking in any house used for kids’ day care, hotel/motel rooms, retail tobacco stores, public access that is rented for private functions, and state-owned vehicles. The measure also creates new employer and owner obligations under the law.

NDFU’s POSITION: support

NDFU policy supports efforts to provide smoke-free establishments.

MEASURE 5: Relating to the prevention of animal cruelty

WHAT THE MEASURE DOES

Makes it a Class C felony to maliciously and intentionally burn, poison, crush, suffocate, impale, drown, blind, skin, beat to death, drag to death, exsanguinate, disembowel, dismember a dog, cat, or horse. 

Creates exemptions similar to those found in current state law such as the marking of an animal for identification, and any other activity that is a usual and customary practice in production agriculture.

NDFU’s POSITION: OPPOSE

This measure doesn’t address most common forms of animal mistreatment – abandonment and neglect. Our vet and shelter partners need stronger laws to focus on the most common forms of abuse. The harms in the measure are rarely, if ever, found in North Dakota.

  • It only focuses on dogs, cats, and horses. We believe all animals should be included.
  • It impedes our efforts to pass comprehensive legislation. We have joined with other ag groups, animal shelters, and vets to rewrite comprehensive legislation to respond to the most common forms of mistreatment and to protect all animals, while recognizing the stewardship standard that almost all North Dakota ranchers and farmers meet. 
  • If this measure passes, the political reality is such that the legislature likely won’t address comprehensive reform for a long while.
  • Even if it does pass, this measure contains language that conflicts with that proposed legislation, that will create confusion that courts will need to address.
  • Outside groups are pushing the initiated measure. Our proposed legislation was written after many meetings with diverse North Dakota groups. The Humane Society of the United States is backing the measure effort; their stated goal is to eliminate animal agriculture, and we’ve heard from local humane societies that this effort is a “foot in the door.”
  • Farmers Union is a member of the North Dakotans for Responsible Animal Care. The group united to advocate a comprehensive legislative solution/rewrite of the current animal welfare statute.
  • Farmers Union is also a member of the coalition North Dakota Animal Stewards, a group that is publicly fighting the HSUS initiated measure. This coalition is working to raise money, hold town hall meetings, and is advocating a “NO” vote on Measure 5. 

 

North Dakota does not have voter registration. However, in order to vote in North Dakota, you must be:
•    A U.S. citizen
•    At least 18 years old on the day of election
•    A North Dakota resident
•    A precinct resident for 30 days preceding the election
Many counties also allow for early voting. Dates and availability differ by county. To find your local voting place and times, click here or contact your local county courthouse for more information.

All eligible North Dakotans have the option to request a ballot before the day of an election in a process known as absentee voting. An application is required to be submitted anytime within the calendar year of an election. Ballots are not available until the fortieth day before an election. For more information or to access the application, click here.

Click here to go to the full voting guide under the Resources and Forms tab under "Voting Guide"